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Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
irreparable damage to the u.s. economy. >>> and jump t to the top of the ftse 100 after third quarter revenue beat the forecast, burberry had earnings higher than expected. >>> all right. sorted out my mike issues. "worldwide exchange" is slightly different today because we're analyzing the first german gdp numbers. >> and i come to the u.s. where it's all annualized and we stick to the european data and it's quarter on quarter. given the context, we're still working through what all that means. >> exports in november, down 94.1 billion is where we essentially went. 98.4 billion was the october numbers. so exports in november driving down. and that gdp number is worth pulling out. exports for the year, up 4.1%. as far as production is concerned, it was up 2% in november. but the forecast were for it to rise up 1%. it was a very weak october, as well. it was this production and that production number. when that came out, it essentially made people put a pretty fourth quarter in the whole, kelly. what we're trying to do is derive what the annual figure was. >> exactly. and before we get to that
in unemployment, and strength in manufacturing, has the u.s. economy has finally turned a corner? >> susie: and messy earnings news from two giant banks: a big earnings miss from citigroup, and a big earnings drop at bank of america. investors dump the stocks. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: hundreds of flights were canceled today and airlines rushed to make back-up plans after regulators around the world grounded boeing's 787 dreamliner. those actions came after the federal aviation association ordered the plane out of the air after two incidents where lithium ion batteries overheated. boeing says it is confident the 787 is safe and says it stands behind the plane's overall integrity. this is only the second time in more than 30 years that regulators have grounded a plane. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: boeing has spent more than $30 billion developing the 787 dreamliner. one reason for the high cost is boeing's decision to upgrade the hydraulics and other mechanical systems with next-generation technology that runs on electricity. >> you've got generators on boar
in unemployment and strength in manufacturing, has the u.s. economy has finally turned a corner? >> susie: and messy earnings news from two giant banks: a big earnings miss from citigroup, and a big earnings drop at bank of america. investors dump the stocks. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: hundreds of flights were canceled today and airlines rushed to make back-up plans after regulators around the world grounded boeing's 787 dreamliner. those actions came after the federal aviation association ordered the plane out of the air after two incidents where lithium ion batteries overheated. boeing says it is confident the 787 is safe and says it stands behind the plane's overall integrity. this is only the second time in more than 30 years that regulators have grounded a plane. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: boeing has spent more than $30 billion developing the 787 dreamliner. one reason for the high cost is boeing's decision to upgrade the hydraulics and other mechanical systems with next-generation technology that runs on electricity. >> you've got generators on boar
.s. economy energized the stock market today. the dow jumped 85 points, the nasdaq added 18, and the s&p gained eight points. here's what inspired investors to buy stocks: housing starts surged more than 12% last month, hitting the highest level since june 2008. permits for future home construction were also the strongest in more than four years. the upbeat december performance echoes other recent measures on housing. and, there was also good news on the labor front: jobless claims fell last week to the lowest level in five years. >> susie: so is the slow growth environment coming to an end, or is the u.s. economy still stuck in neutral? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: ann lenane has sold real estate in up and down markets, what she says about today's market might surprise you. >> the real estate market is hot. it is on fire. >> reporter: her read on real estate market makes sense given that home sales and new construction are recovering from their recent steep declines. and, some economists believe housing will replace manufacturing as a key growth driver this year. beyond the hou
downturn. the problem is the program has not worked well. it is not tied to the condition of the economy. it needs to be fixed. roseanne. -- >> roseanne. >> i am inspired. i want folks to understand they have to engage. they cannot trust those in washington d.c.. we have got to take control in our democracy. i want to talk about the fact this goes back to unemployment. it is a very easy read. it cuts to the chase in terms of facts that there are programs to get through and get 100% employment. do not discount america. take control of america. [applause] >> i forgot to mention, the book is called america's poor and the great recession. ideas about what democrats and republicans can agree on. speaker gingrich. >> thank you for assembling an amazing group and a fascinating evening. i hope everybody found it as intriguing as i did. it is clear our institutions and poverty -- institutions are not working. there is a need to rethink from the ground up and use all of the various technologies. then have a conference at the end and then give a major speak. i think we do not have the solutions in
and track called sentra an economy car minus the look and feel of an economy car. wonder how civic and corolla look and feel about that. the all-new nissan sentra, with best-in-class mpg. lease for $169 per month. visit choosenissan.com. >>> for two-term presidents, their >>> for two-term presidents, their second inaugural is often a chance to outline the new visions and attempt to emphasize the successes of their first term with an eye towards shaping their place in history. throughout the past 226 years only 16 presidents have delivered two inaugural addresses. we put the speeches of the last three two-term presidents through a word cloud to see what themes they chose to emphasize. by looking at the words they used the most, we can get a sense of the legacies they wanted to leave. president reagan who at the first inaugural famously claimed that government wasn't the solution, but the problem aimed to underscore that principal by using the word government 16 times. >> that system has never failed us. but for a time, we failed the system. we asked things of government that governm
to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> we're back. political director and chief white house correspondent chuck todd will take us inside the numbers of the latest poll as you tee up the second term, chuck. >> four years ago, enormous expectations for president obama. there were a lot of people, hope and change was big. this time, call it pragmatic hope as far as the public is concerned. as you see here, just less than 30% believe they're going to evaluate president obama with a clean fresh slate. 64% will evaluate him based on past feelings. and here, a continuation of a trend we saw throughout the first term. very similar to what ronald reagan dealt w
can see here, look at the most popular phrases. a lot of them have to do with the economy. fix the economy. create jobs. then there's stop spending. and then of course probably the most important that he will talk about tomorrow, compromise, work together. >> chuck todd, thank you very much. >>> let me bring in the rest of our roundtable here. joe scarborough is here from msnbc's "morning joe." senior adviser to obama in 2012, the re-election campaign, david axelrod. chief foreign correspondent richard engel is here, safe and sound in studio. richard, it's great to see you in person this morning. "new york times" best-selling author of "team of rivals" doris kearns goodwin. in between awards shows she's joined us. and nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw. welcome to all of you. tom, that's where we tee it up. the president, as he begins a second term, very difficult climate in washington and very real expectations. >> yes. and i was looking at those top three priorities for the american people. and they all fit into his single most difficult task, it seems to me, both conc
stronger in the second half. >> for the economy? i think we have to divorce the economy from the market. >> have we been price thatting that out? >> we have to be clear that markets are totally different from the economy. for the markets, we're looking at 2% scenario. scenario a would be similar to 2012 where i think actually the economy doesn't do that well. the first half is difficult. second half is a bit better. we've still got the fed printing 5 billion a month. we could see a rerun of 2012. maybe mid to single high digit returns. >> did you get exposure of citi to bofa here? >> we wouldn't be. we're taking a little bit of money off the table or indeed i think we did. the level of implied volatility makes perfect sense here. >> we'll leave it here for now. thanks very much. over to you, ross. >> kelly, thanks for that. so we are just about an hour and 20 minutes into the trading day here in europe. you can see advancers just about outpace decliners by a ratio of 6 to 4 and we're up near the high point of the session which has dragged us back into prospect on that particular indices
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
about the u.s. economy, the turning in the house prices, europe, for example, these things will make an extraordinary amount of money even if they require more capital because banks are extremely leveraged institutions. and you only need a small amount of top line growth for them to make a lot of profits. >> if you to pick u.s. banks versus the rest of the world, what do you like for 2013? >> it bizarre thing is that last year everybody was upset about the masters of the universe and were talking up their retail and sort of consumer arms because credit losses were falling. interestingly, this year i suspect bank with more exposure to independent banking will probably do a lot better much to the chagrin of politicians i suspect. why is that? the m&a pipeline's looking all right. u.s. economy's looking slightly better. and we're still pre-basal 3. >> we'll leave it there. lex on wex, can we use that? >> yeah. >> is that all right with you? >> fine by me. >> lex on wex. >> stuart, thank you very much. we will be talking later about divestment. merger and acquisition activity this year d
sensitive to the economy commodity in the world. ip took out a lot of capacity. ip is a genius. this company's had an unmitigated run. capacity's constrained, prices going up, 95% of capacity. that is like -- you can put the price increase after price increase, that says the economy is much stronger than expected. this is the first commodity to raise prices big when things get better. they're raising prices consistently. very bullish. >> that is a great, great tell. still more to come this morning. get ready for an ipo hat trick, sunco energy partners, norwegian cruise lines, all making their debuts this morning. stick around to see how they open for trading. the opening bell is just a few minutes away. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] t
of the economy. a discussion about the fed earlier in terms of the beige book numbers. what do you think that tells us on where we are in the economy? >> look at numbers of the last week or two, retail production numbers for december, and they were actually pretty good. of course, the employment numbers we already know were soiled, and this is in a period where the uncertainty over the fiscal cliff was reaching a maximum. you know, maria, you think that's pretty encouraging that the economy has managed to cope with a high level of uncertainty. now the thing that kind of bothers me though is i'm a little bit worried that this coping is flipping over to complacency. the vix is now at a six-year low, and it tells me that the market is discounting 100% probability that we get through the debt ceiling without any trouble. that seems too high to me. >> so do you think the market is expecting that? i mean, when would you expect a big change in terms of the interest rate scenario? >> in terms of the interest rate scenario, probably nothing this year. i mean, we're at least a couple years away fr
in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how d
the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big
countries. why this site specifically? it is about gas and oil, that is the backbone of the economy and of course that is of great interest for the europeans who import from algeria. melissa: why attack in algeria for what is happening in molly? you can see they are neighbors, but why would this be the best way to make a statement, do you think? >> algeria has opened its airspace between friends in the north and the train into mali. it aided france in attacking al qaeda in mali. this is a lesson, a revenge against algeria to stop them from along the french across into mali. melissa: what is our role, what is the proper response for us? there are americans involved among the hostages, we have a drone overhead but it is limited given the algerian military is on-site. what can america do and what should we do? >> that is things we cannot talk about what the government will not talk about. obviously a special mission is being prepared that would emerge if they're executed, but let's be clear, the lead is the algerians. they are on the ground surrounding the flight. some hostages have be
the debt ceiling or put the u.s. economy st. at risk. it's tuesday, january 15th, 2013 and "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin. we've been watching the u.s. equity futures and at least at this point you can see they do look like they're indicated to open a little lower. right now, dow futures down by about 16 points below fair value. the s&p futures are about 2 points below fair value. we have some different nebs going on at the top of the screen than we do on that fair value board. we'll check on that, as well. >>> dell is said to be in talks with private companies in reports of a possible guyout. the journal says jpmorgan is involved in the negotiations. dell shares have been soaring near an eight-month high on first word of this news yesterday. you can see up about close to 2% to the premarket sales. 64 is the last dip. in other technology news, facebook is holing a press conference today. no word on what the big announcement will be. you've heard a lot of analy
that is indeed worrisome. however, we are seeing some pretty good signs in the economy right now, so we're hopefully optimistic that they'll continue. and last thing anybody who's bet against america has proved it's a losing bet in the past. we're very bullish on this country. >> steve, thanks so much for your time. thank you for joining us first on cnbc. >> thank you. >>> interesting debate. meantime, goldman sachs making waves with the bonus pay joits. we'll get that in a moment. after the break, david faber's exclusive with mel karmazin. he's here to give us his very first interview since stepping down as the ceo of sirius xm. we're back in a couple of minutes. mine was earned in djibouti, africa, 2004. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to s
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
, housing is better, you want to be invested in this economy for the next three to five years because that's where you're going to make money. you're not going to make money in fixed income. you're not going to make money focusing on only pure dividend stocks that are 5%, 6%. you're going to have to have companies that can grow the top lines, that have the ability to shepherd capital and really can take the consumer that is now in a better shape than the u.s. and now is getting better overseas to grow your company. >> okay. so you're talking mostly about multi national companies or -- >> multi nationals and secular growth companies. >> both? >> both, absolutely. but you want good companies with management that are just not going to sit there and do financial engineering and say, oh, we borrowed more money and because our cost of debt is lower than our dividend and we can do that. that party is over. that game is done. you really want the companies that i think if you want to beat the market and we think actually the market is going to have -- is going to grow, gives you a look at how much
are and as much as we can tell about the economy and financial sector, we will be obsessed with jamie dimon, if he didn't get as much of a bonus as normal because his pristine reputation because of the wale slipping -- thing we can find as members of the media. >> $6 million trade on a balance sheet of -- >> i don't know how much they made in spite of that. a lot. >>> speaking of the bank, another -- >> look who's here! >> and dressed normally, too. >> can we get the man a chair? he can't sit -- ♪ >> we thought you were trying on different zweaters. on a day like this, what is the right look for a young, happening, dashing -- >> what -- what -- >> you have time. don't do this to viewers. it's not that important. did you not get make-up? >> no. he didn't. >> look at -- this is natural beauty. >> you didn't shave -- you really think you need to be here that much that you can't get make-up? >> absolutely. >> taking one for the team. >> all right. >> speaking of this -- stay on us, please. morgan stanley will take -- you can get powder or something if you want. just headlines -- >> the women didn't
by superstorm sandy. >> dupont 2013, a cautious year with the slow growth world economy. how worrisome are those comments from the economic bellwether. >> j & j exceeds estimates. the full year forecast a bit below the streets, as investors pay close attention to new ceo alex gorsky. >>> the dow component reporting fourth quarter numbers of 38 cents. that was well below estimates. verizon said the results were impacted by superstorm sandy. we're just getting details now, david, on activations on things like the iphone, 6.2 million, not too shabby. >> the problem was not necessarily activations, carl. the key is simply that margins came in even worse than had been anticipated. this, after the company already guided them down a bit at the consumer electronics show a couple of weeks back. and there, of course, you're talking about operating koose i higher than anticipated. investors may be a little concerned today when you take a look at that chart there. now, listen, to carl's point, they're adding a lot of customers. they're activating a lot of devices. we talk often about the subsidy for the app
is working very past to become an information economy without being an information society. they want to be a 21st century economy with a 20th century political system and we saw that right after we put the report out you suddenly had these demonstration i assure you we had no part in against censorship in china and one of the first major decisions made was the new prident was to gt out there and say the chinese communist party will not tolerate unorthodox situate in the press or in the media .. >> but i mean that is the fear it would undermine the power of the communist party. >> that's right. >> that was always the fear. >> and i think in an environment where you have hundreds of millions of chinese on twitter, that increasingly are learning their government officials are worth billions of dollars. >> rose: basically you are saying their fear is legitimate. >> i think their fear is legitimate, i don't think the country is going to fall apart. >> rose: butery rong protesmoveme that has legs could provide a challenge over -- >> that's right. and they are so unwilling to risk that, the
and partnering with things that are made in the usa. it's going to be just enormous for our economy. >> it's the largest company in world's history, walmart. they sell more food than -- food -- than any company in the world. >> i had no idea. >> that's how massive it is. 1.6 million employees. >> i think this could really make a difference in our economy. we need it. >>> all right. coming up, what happens when two retirees head to prison with their knitting kits. >> we'll show you those doing hard time with needles and yarn. you can't miss that. stay tuned. you're watching "world news now." stay tuned. you're watching "world news now." ♪ >>> good musical choice, huh? good musical choice. >> good stuff. all right. when you think about criminals serving time behind bars, you probably figure they're pumping iron or shooting hoops. >> and knitting is probably the last thing that comes to mind. two retirees are turning convicts into converts with yarn. here's abc's t.j. winnick with more. >> reporter: barbed wire fences, watchman towers, and a group of men with felony convictions. >> armed ki
economy, is signaling they're on board, announcing today they'll spend $50 billion over ten years on new products all made right here at home. so, how many jobs could that be? our made in america captain is back, david muir, on the case. david? >> reporter: that's right, diane. walmart now the latest and largest retailer to say, in essence, wait a minute. while the math of making things overseas made a lot of sense, it doesn't always add up now. and economists arguing their move today was about far more than just p.r. tonight, walmart with that bold promise. buying an additional $50 billion in goods to sell, made in america over the next decade. it comes after years of criticism that walmart doesn't pay enough in wages and that the company sells too many products overseas. critics arguing that's how they keep their prices so low. we asked walmart shoppers to check the labels today. it didn't take long. maria small and her new blouse -- >> made in china. >> reporter: this couple and their new stool. >> made in china. >> reporter: but today, walmart u.s. was adamant, saying two-thirds of w
. and there's the economy, the jobs which was his focus for the first term. >> yes, and we have the fiscal cliffs. the automatic budget cuts, what to do with the federal budget, so yes a lot of things and then as you mentioned, the economy still underneath everything. that will be a big issue as we move forward this year. >> reporter: one last question, what do you think his legacy will be? >> that will depend on what gets done. i mean, you can give all of the great speeches you want and lay out all of the great plans but if you don't get anything done that will be your legacy. we'll see. i mean, right now, healthcare is certainly his legacy, where the economy goes will depend on how he's viewed in the long- term, too. >> reporter: thank you. nice to see you. appreciate it. you can find a link to jamie's blog at ktvu.com. i just spoke to darrell steinberg, mup in my next report, his special issue he's pushing during his visit and how the nation's capital has a different view of california than it did four years ago. reporting live in washington, d.c., i'm tori campbell, ktvu channel 2 news
't number 2 million. the history of this administration has already been made. but also the economy isn't in a fr fr freefall. it doesn't feel as dire as it did. >> as you mentioned, this is one of these moments. this is one of the symbols that we who love this democracy cherish so much. the president using this opportunity. we talk about the big moments in a presidency. this is one of them. i'm told this is an inaugural address that will be forceful and will be short. this is a president who has had to change in office, perhaps down scale his ambitions on that goal he set out four years ago about changing the culture of washington. that is the unfinished business. but he meets at this hour with the bipartisan congressional leaders of congress. a symbol of bipartisanship when so many americans want to see the reality of bipartisanship. four more years, so the constitution says he gets here, but the political calendar is a lot shorter. he has a finite amount of time to get what he wants to get done done. >> chuck todd is standing by at the white house. our chief political correspondent,
. but obviously he's going to be talking about jobs and the economy. i think in order to do that, he's got to be making us more competitive throughout the world with other countries because you look what's going on in india and china and others and brazil, as an example, and they're eating our lunch. we'll be discussing obviously immigration, which, again, whether it's republican or democrat, they have to get on the band wagon because something has to be done with respect to immigration. and it can be done in a positive way. reducing the debt is a very big thing. i know he'll be talking about guns and some people like that and some people don't. but he'll probably be mentioning that. terrorism is a big thing. you look at it just in watching your show previous to my going on, i'm looking at all that's going on in the world with terrorism and we're not making too much of a dent because it is a mess. they were talking about and our president was talking about how wonderful mali is. mali has been overrun. it's really a big problem, terrorism. so obviously that's going to be high on the agenda
and tell people it is going to save their economy, when actually it devastates local communities. >> hundreds of people gathered in new york city on saturday for a public memorial service honoring and schwartz, the internet freedom activist who took his own life earlier this month. he was weeks before trial date for downloading millions of articles provided by the nonprofit research service jstor at mit. swartz was facing 35 years in prison, a penalty supporters called excessively harsh. at the memorial, aaron swartz's partner, taren stinebrickner- kauffman, called for prosecutors to be held accountable. >> on last friday he face the prospect of yet another three months of uncertainty of ups and downs of being forced by the government to spend every fiber of his being on this damnable, since this trial. with no guarantee could exonerate himself at the end of it. he was so scared and so frustrated and so desperate and more than anything, just so weary. i think he just could not take it another day. aarib would have loved to have been here because of the last week, phoenix's are al
economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together we discovered that a free market only -- and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. through it all we have never relinquished, nor have we succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiatives and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change so must we. that fidelity to our funding principles requires new responses to new challenges. our individual requires collective action, the american people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than american soldiers that met the forces of fascism or communism with musicales and militias, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or builds the roads and networks an
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

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